Fibromyalgia: Exercise is essential

Print Article

Fibromyalgia (FM) is now considered a central nervous system (CNS) disorder rather than a musculoskeletal condition. Successful management of FM is best accomplished using a variety of different approaches including chiropractic adjustments, soft tissue therapies, exercise, diet, supplementation, stress management, cognitive behavioral therapy, and more. Common symptoms of FM include chronic fatigue and mental fog. The focus of this discussion will be on exercise and chiropractic.

Low intensity movement is recommended to decrease FM pain. A sedentary lifestyle reduces cerebrospinal fluid flow and can lead to increased oxidative stress in the brain. Throughout the day, add in plenty of low-intensity movement such as walking and light cycling. Regular movement will help reduce inflammation and boost the development of new neurons in the brain.

A slow but steady pace is recommended when starting a program, making sure that pain and fatigue are under control prior to introducing aerobic exercise. Get an initial assessment of current fitness level and then start one to two levels below that level, gradually building up stamina to a goal of 20-30 minutes of moderate aerobic activity 5-6 days per week. Exercises that emphasize low-impact, high-aerobic output are the best, with water-based exercises at the top of the list. Walking or simply swinging the arms and legs against the resistance of water is extremely effective. A study published in Arthritis Research & Therapy reported improved health-related quality of life in women with FM for those participating in water aerobics. The soothing benefits of warm water are helpful, and group classes add social benefits.

Since FM is a CNS not a muscle condition disorder another brain stimulating exercise is balancing. Depending on the age, agility, and comfort of the person, adding balance-challenging exercises can be beneficial. Chiropractic adjustments can be extremely beneficial. Those with FM, chronic pain and fatigue are highly likely to have neurological dysfunction in their upper neck. Subluxation, or neurological interference, in the upper cervical region of the neck alters endorphin release into the body. This leads to increased states of pain, fatigue, anxiety and accelerated stress as well as mal-coordinated immunity.

Well trained chiropractors can analyze these regions of the spine and give specific corrective adjustments to restore balance and optimal neurological expression in these regions. This reduces the stress response and improves endorphin release, and ultimately, improves the individual’s pain tolerance and overall well-being.

For more information, contact Dr. Wendy at haydenhealth@gmail.com.

Print Article

Read More Healthy Community

Food Allergies … matter of life or death

May 24, 2017 at 5:00 am | Coeur d'Alene Press Food Allergy Awareness Week took place May 14 — 20. That week may be over, but for those who live with food allergies or care for someone who does, are aware every week of the year. For them, it coul...

Comments

Read More

Ergonomic advantage with chiropractic corrections

May 24, 2017 at 5:00 am | Coeur d'Alene Press Prolonged sitting and improperly fitted workstations are contributing to increased neck and low back pain in the workplace. Proper posture and positioning, often referred to as ergonomics is one of t...

Comments

Read More

Chiropractic and X-rays

May 24, 2017 at 5:00 am | Coeur d'Alene Press Why do chiropractors take X-rays? For the same reason dentists and orthopedists take X-rays, to get more information. X-rays are very helpful diagnostic tools. X-rays are form of electromagnetic rad...

Comments

Read More

Worming into your life: Part II

May 24, 2017 at 5:00 am | Coeur d'Alene Press In Part I of “Worming into Your life,” we explored how parasites can be a part of your life by vectors we weren’t even aware of. These include our dogs or cats, bed bugs, ticks, mosquitoes, flies and...

Comments

Read More

Contact Us

(208) 664-8176
215 N. Second St
Coeur d'Alene, Idaho 83814

©2017 The Coeur d'Alene Press Terms of Use Privacy Policy
X
X