High Court docket a blockbuster

Print Article

Itís a new year and a new Justice for the Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS), which began its new term last week. Their 43-case docket includes some blockbusters ó civil rights vs. religion; cellphone privacy; presidential power and travel bans; redistricting; and free speech.

Here are a few highlights:

Trump v. International Refugee Assistance Project, and Trump v. Hawaii. While the 90-day ban on people from certain majority-Muslim countries was reinstated, legal questions remain. Do the so-called bans violate the First Amendmentís Establishment Clause (prohibiting religious discrimination)? Are they too broad in scope?

Another case concerning U.S. entries, Jennings v. Rodriguez, questions lengthy detentions (e.g., six months) without bond hearings.

Gill v. Whitford. This case challenges Wisconsinís allegedly partisan gerrymandering ó the redrawing of legislative districts along political lines to influence voting results. What SCOTUS decides could affect up to a third of American districts redrawn in the last 50 years.

Carpenter v. U.S. Is your mobile phone use private? Police used a robberís cellphone records over 127 days, without a warrant, to track him. Whether this violates the Fourth Amendmentís search and seizure protections is the issue, but cellphone privacy advocates are watching this one too.

Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission. Weddings donít often make judicial history, but when a Colorado baker refused on religious grounds to make a cake for a same-sex couple, two areas of civil rights came into direct conflict. Colorado law prohibits businesses from discriminating based on sexual orientation.

Three consolidated cases on arbitration. Already heard Oct. 2, these cases address the legality and

constitutionality of requiring employee consent to arbitration (deciding disputes outside of court), and prohibiting employee participation in class action suits. Millions of employees are required to sign such ďagreements,Ē which favor employers, as a condition of employment. Federal laws addressing labor relations, collective bargaining, and arbitration processes are potentially impacted.

For a full list of cases on the Supreme Courtís docket, Scotusblog.com/case-files/terms/ot2017/.

ēēē

Sholeh Patrick, J.D. is a columnist with the Hagadone News Network. Contact her at Sholeh@cdapress.com.

Print Article

Read More Sholeh Patrick

Research: Pledge in schools offered, not forced

October 16, 2018 at 5:00 am | Coeur d'Alene Press News of an Atlanta school districtís removal of the pledge in public schools in August renewed nationwide debate over an old controversy. After a local teacher expressed frustration over the misinfor...

Comments

Read More

Travel: No trick: Halloween is a town in Oregon

October 11, 2018 at 5:00 am | Coeur d'Alene Press Halloween ainít what it used to be. No longer a mere one-night candy scramble, All Hallows Eve is becoming a major holiday in its own right. More houses decorated, more costumery, more hokey pumpki...

Comments

Read More

Research/Opinion

October 09, 2018 at 5:00 am | Coeur d'Alene Press Empathy is nice. Compassion is better. But when it comes to shifting cultural attitudes, what counts most is complete understanding. Thatís impossible without an exercise in what it is like to live t...

Comments

Read More

Research & Opinion: Time for Columbus to step aside

October 04, 2018 at 5:00 am | Coeur d'Alene Press In an otherwise harmonious marriage, one debate soon reached a bright line: I was wrong. We tend to accept the cultural perspectives of youth. I had to step back to see things anew from a viewpoint I...

Comments

Read More

Contact Us

(208) 664-8176
215 N. Second St
Coeur d'Alene, Idaho 83814

©2018 The Coeur d'Alene Press Terms of Use Privacy Policy
X
X