A mysterious quartz cranium

Print Article

  • A close-up of the skull that will be at the Holistic Festival on May 19 in Spokane Valley. (Courtesy Photo)

  • 1

    Bill Homann is pictured with the skull he has been the keeper of since 2007. (Courtesy Photo)

  • A close-up of the skull that will be at the Holistic Festival on May 19 in Spokane Valley. (Courtesy Photo)

  • 1

    Bill Homann is pictured with the skull he has been the keeper of since 2007. (Courtesy Photo)

Indiana Jones once found a crystal skull, but on Saturday, May 19, you can see one without raiding an ancient tomb.

The Mitchell-Hedges crystal skull is regarded by some as a sacred artifact with connections to legend and history.

“It’s ingrained in the Mayan religion, and they see it as a powerful force,” said Bill Homann, keeper of the skull. “They have a great respect and reverence for it. When you’re around it, you feel that something is there. It’s something you have to see… you can’t quite put it in words.”

Homann will present the skull as part of a 90-minute lecture on the legend and its spiritual significance at the Holistic Festival, held 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, May 19 at CenterPlace at Mirabeau Point Park in the Spokane Valley.

As told by Homann, the crystal skull was discovered in Belize in 1923 by Anna Mitchell-Hedges, adopted daughter of British adventurer F.A. Mitchell-Hedges. Homann was a close friend of Anna’s in her final years, before becoming the caretaker of the artifact after her death in 2007.

Homann has subsequently appeared on a number of documentaries and television specials about crystal skulls, including documented expeditions to other potential crystal skull sites. He was even a special guest at the Cannes, France screening of “Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull,” which drew inspiration from the artifact and the supernatural legends associated with it.

His main focus, however, has been to travel the country and share the experience of what he believes happens when people get near the skull.

“There was a number of years where I took it out of the limelight, but I feel like it’s my purpose to go around and let people see it… I’ve been trying to carry on with what I feel like (Anna) was trying to do with it. She didn’t want it to be stored in a museum,” Homann said.

The Mitchell-Hedges skull is known for the clarity of its quartz and its detachable jaw. Part of its notoriety is the idea that it was carved against the natural axis of the quartz and that no marks of metal tools are apparent in the piece. However, some researchers debate the origins, believing the skull was created much later in history and holds no direct association with the Mayan culture.

Homann believes the artifact dates back to ancient times and that crystal skulls serve as spirit guides found by the people who discover and keep them. He considers it the “Skull of Love,” though suggests it can serve different functions for different people.

“With the skull, it’s never boring. All the stuff I’ve been through in the last 10 years is pretty mind-boggling,” he said.

In his presentation, Homann will share the Mitchell-Hedges story, detail some of the history and debate surrounding the artifact and take the audience on a guided meditation with the skull. The 90-minute lecture will be held at 2 p.m. at the Holistic Festival.

The local Holistic Festival began around 2003 as a means to expose people to alternative ways of healing and living, according to organizer Cindy Gardner.

“There certainly always was the hardcore group that always believed in the philosophy, but more and more people are learning about it, and finding the things that work for them,” Gardner said. “It’s about taking more control of their health.”

Gardner has specialized in in life coaching and healing, Reiki healing methods and psychic readings. She said the lectures and vendors are intended to provide a wide spectrum of ideas and methods, from spiritual and psychic readings to natural-based products for anti-aging and allergies.

More than 50 vendors will offer things like life coach services, essential oils, herbal and natural-based products for food, skin and pain relief, vitamins, supplements and much more.

“People can come and learn. We are a small enough event so that there’s time for people to go around and talk to every vendor there, learn about what they’re doing and what new things are being offered,” Gardner said.

In addition to the crystal skull presentation, lectures include a non-religious look at the concept of the soul, diet choices for healthy radiant skin, the power of the subconscious mind, psychic panels, legal medical cannabis choices, Tai Chi and much more.

A complete list of lectures and vendors can be found at www.HolisticFestivals.com. Admission is $6. CenterPlace at Mirabeau Point Park is located at 2426 N. Discovery Place in the Spokane Valley.

Print Article

Read More CoeurVoice

Thanks for the beta, Alex

June 14, 2018 at 12:56 pm | Coeur d'Alene Press The call came as a harsh reality check. I sat down, stunned. The consistent momentum of life rasped to a halt, the gears grinding. Alex Reed had fallen at Smith Rock. In the following days I foun...

Comments

Read More

Lake Cd’A: An Instagram star

June 14, 2018 at 12:28 pm | Coeur d'Alene Press What does Lake Coeur d’Alene have in common with the Magic Kingdom in Florida, Waikiki Beach in Hawaii and Wrigley Field in Illinois? It’s the “most Instagrammed landmark” in its state, according t...

Comments

Read More

How do we define cyberbullying?

June 14, 2018 at 12:40 pm | Coeur d'Alene Press Cyberbullying is a big concern for parents, but how do we define it, and do our children see it differently? The definition of bullying from StopBullying.gov is: Bullying is unwanted, aggressive beh...

Comments

Read More

Collegen

June 14, 2018 at 12:23 pm | Coeur d'Alene Press This week, I want to cover the benefits of adding collagen to your nutrition plan. Collagen is essential for everyone across all age groups and is significantly critical for us as we age. Collagen, ...

Comments

Read More

Contact Us

(208) 664-8176
215 N. Second St
Coeur d'Alene, Idaho 83814

©2018 The Coeur d'Alene Press Terms of Use Privacy Policy
X
X