DR. WENDY CUNNINGHAM: High cholesterol and heart disease

Print Article

PAID CONTENT

Cholesterol has gotten a bad rap over the last several decades. However, it is one of the most important molecules in your body. It is found in every cell in your body, not just the bloodstream. It helps produce hormones like estrogen, testosterone and progesterone. It helps produce bile acids to digest fats. It assists in the production of cell membranes and insulates nerve cells. In your skin, it is transformed by sunlight into vitamin D. It is important for brain health and helps you form memories.

It’s important to realize that the conventional view that cholesterol causes heart disease was based on seriously flawed research. Total cholesterol tells you virtually nothing about your health risk. Dr. Frank Lipman states, cholesterol-lowering drugs are not required or prudent for the majority of people — especially if high cholesterol and longevity run in your family.

If your doctor tells you your cholesterol is too high based on the standard lipid profile, getting a more complete picture is important — especially if you have a family history of heart disease or other risk factors.

The following test will provide a more accurate picture of your heart disease risk than total cholesterol alone:

• NMR LipoProfile. This test measures particle size of LDL (low density lipoprotein) cholesterol. Large LDL particles are not harmful. Only small dense LDL particles can be a potential problem, as they can squeeze through the lining of your arteries.

• Hs-C-reactive protein, Lipoprotein (a) and serum fibrinogen.

• HDL/Cholesterol ratio: HDL percentage is a very potent heart disease risk factor. Just divide your HDL level by your total cholesterol. That percentage should ideally be above 24 percent.

• Triglyceride/HDL ratios: You can also do the same thing with your triglycerides and HDL ratio. That percentage should be below 2.

• Fasting insulin and blood sugar levels: Studies have shown that people with a fasting blood sugar level of 100-125 mg/dl had a nearly 300 percent higher risk of having coronary heart disease than people with a level below 79 mg/dl.

• Your iron level: Excess iron levels you can damage your blood vessels and increase your risk of heart disease.

The results of these tests should allow you to make better and more customized treatment decisions. This is especially important when it comes to the deciding if medication is necessary. The list of side effects for statins is long, and the benefits are debatable.

For tips on how to lower your risk of heart disease naturally, email Dr. Wendy at haydenhealth@gmail.com.

Print Article

Read More Healthy Community

GEORGE BALLING: With most sincere thanks

November 16, 2017 at 6:18 pm | Coeur d'Alene Press PAID CONTENT Our shop, the dinner party, has been open now for nearly 10 years, actually next month on Dec. 17 is the big anniversary. Since Mary and I moved to the area, for her it was moving hom...

Comments

Read More

HOLLY CARLING: The sugar path

November 16, 2017 at 6:18 pm | Coeur d'Alene Press PAID CONTENT Whenever we hear about blood sugar challenges we think of sugar consumption, cravings and feeling deprived if we are told we cannot keep consuming it. Or, we think of the disease aspe...

Comments

Read More

WAYNE M. FICHTER JR.: Arthritis pain and what chiropractic can do

November 16, 2017 at 6:18 pm | Coeur d'Alene Press PAID CONTENT According to the Centers for disease Control, just in the United States alone, 23 percent of all adults, or over 54 million people, have some form of arthritis. The term arthritis ref...

Comments

Read More

DR. DONALD JOHNSON: Sleep problems: They kill your sex life and can lead to divorce

November 16, 2017 at 6:18 pm | Coeur d'Alene Press PAID CONTENT Sleeping — the most important part of your 24-hour day. It helps restore and maintain our body’s systems — immune, musculoskeletal, and nervous systems. It also helps to maintain ment...

Comments

Read More

Contact Us

(208) 664-8176
215 N. Second St
Coeur d'Alene, Idaho 83814

©2017 The Coeur d'Alene Press Terms of Use Privacy Policy
X
X