Former police chief’s lawsuit against Home Depot dismissed

Print Article

COEUR d'ALENE — The lawsuit of an embattled former Idaho police chief who sued Home Depot after falling from a shelf in his garage was dismissed this week in U.S. District Court in Coeur d'Alene.

U.S. District Judge Stanley A. Bastian ordered the case be dismissed and that each party shoulder costs accrued in the suit.

“The parties stipulate that the above-captioned action be dismissed with prejudice and with each side to bear their own costs and fees,” Bastian wrote in his ruling.

Attorneys hired by Home Depot, and Paul Thomas Clark of Lewiston who represented former Lewiston Police Chief Chris Ankeny, agreed to the dismissal filed Monday in U.S. District Court.

The suit was a result of a fall that Ankeny took in March 2016 after using a Husky, four-tiered, metal storage shelf purchased at Home Depot as a ladder to retrieve boots from a neighboring shelf in his garage.

The shelving unit collapsed and Ankeny suffered wrist and forearm injuries when he fell to the concrete floor. He sought $200,000 in damages from Home Depot alleging the shelf should have held his weight, despite attached warnings to not use the shelf as a ladder.

The accident occurred six months after Ankeny, who previously served as a police captain in North Las Vegas, was hired as the city's police chief. Ankeny's tenure in Lewiston was rocky, according to reports. Not long after becoming the chief of police he withheld the names of officers injured when a handgun discharged inside the police department. During his brief tenure, he blacked out media, refused to release information during weekends, and prohibited the press inside the department, according to reports. He purchased an armored vehicle without city council consent, and built a controversial security fence around the department and a once-public parking lot.

Ankeny resigned last month citing an inability to work with Lewiston's city manager.

The lawsuit was originally filed in 2016 in Lewiston's 2nd District Court, but was moved to federal court at the request of both parties.

Clark's law office, Clark and Feeney of Lewiston, said a confidentiality agreement prevented any statements from being released regarding the case.

Ankeny, according to court records, was prepared to call seven expert witnesses from the Lewiston medical community if the case went to trial. A Moscow-based mechanical engineer was listed as Home Depot's expert, according to court records.

Print Article

Read More Local News

Second time’s the charm

August 15, 2018 at 5:00 am | Coeur d'Alene Press RATHDRUM — Upon further review, one of Rathdrum's largest annexation requests in recent memory is still moving ahead with an approval recommendation. Planning and Zoning Commissioner Deborah Furey —...

Comments

Read More

Glory bound

August 15, 2018 at 5:00 am | Coeur d'Alene Press By DEVIN WEEKS Staff Writer For the second time in Gem State history, an Idaho team is heading to the Little League Baseball World Series. For the first time, it’s Coeur d’Alene’s boys who are r...

Comments

Read More

Man pleads guilty in death of mom, kids

August 15, 2018 at 5:00 am | Coeur d'Alene Press COEUR d’ALENE — A 47-year-old accused of supplying the drugs that may have resulted in the 2016 death of Misty Phelps and her two children pleaded guilty as part of a plea agreement to one count of d...

Comments

Read More

Hayden tweaks CBD zone

August 15, 2018 at 5:00 am | Coeur d'Alene Press HAYDEN — City Council members voted 3-1 to amend the central business district zoning code Tuesday. Sandy Young of Verdis proposed the text amendment. The CBD currently allows residential uses on u...

Comments

Read More

Contact Us

(208) 664-8176
215 N. Second St
Coeur d'Alene, Idaho 83814

©2018 The Coeur d'Alene Press Terms of Use Privacy Policy
X
X