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Posted: Tuesday, December 4, 2012 1:00 am

HAYDEN LAKE - Cars blared their horns and drivers waved on Monday morning at the corner of Hayden Avenue and Strahorn Road, where a gaggle of teenagers were raising their fists and shaking signs.

The roughly 25 students from Coeur d'Alene High School were protesting over an issue that has drawn passion in Hayden Lake: The recent conversion of part of Strahorn Road into a one-way road.

Standing for hours in the morning chill, the students aimed at sending a message to the Hayden Lake City Council, said 17-year-old Jeremiah Hazard.

They wanted to see the road made two-way again, he said, and improved to accommodate the heavy traffic.

"We want to see some effort, instead of shutting down the road without talking to people," said Hazard, who lives off Strahorn and said the change has forced him to reroute his daily return from school. "It's a main arterial, they shouldn't block off traffic."

The Hayden Lake City Council voted two years ago to convert Strahorn Road to a one-way between Hayden and Miles avenues, due to the road's deteriorating condition.

The city lacks the $800,000 to $1 million necessary for improvements.

Other issues also prompted the change, like safety concerns for cyclists and pedestrians on the narrow road, and the fact that 50 trees would be chopped to make room for upgrades.

The students on Monday spoke of how the now one-way road by the Hayden Lake Country Club has pushed more traffic into surrounding residential areas, and has made traveling northbound in the area more time consuming.

"See that garbage truck? It had to go all the way around to hit these houses," said Devon Unruh, 17, pointing to a garbage truck that he said would have to re-route around the country club.

"If you have friends who live on that street, it sucks," added Brooke Nipper, 17, who lives on Lookout Drive. "You have to go all the way around, and sometimes it's late at night."

Unruh, who lives in Hayden, added that he has to take a longer route home from school.

"It's the greatest inconvenience," he said.

The protesters argued that the community would be willing to contribute financially to improve the road. Other issues can be overcome with a little creativity, some said.

"The outreach we've seen means people would be willing to support it," said Adam Crandall, 18, a Dalton Gardens resident who drives through Hayden Lake often.

The teens waved signs reading "Honk for 2-way Strahorn" and "End war on transportation."

Hayden Lake Mayor Chris Beck, not mayor when Strahorn became a one-way, said improving the road is more financially feasible with one lane, than two.

"We're working to reconstruct the one lane in 2013," said Beck, who saw the protest on Monday.

Residents of Hayden Lake "by and large" support the one-way street, Beck said.

He doesn't see funds coming through soon to allow for two lanes, he added.

"In the foreseeable future, with the funding we have available, we don't see it changing in the near future," Beck said.

One might wonder why the high school students chose this week to protest the one-way change made in 2010.

Well, their AP Government class was requiring them to participate in eight hours of a government-related activity.

"This is more fun than going to a school board meeting," Nipper said.

The students at least got all the tastes of a decent protest. Drivers honked support, the police dropped by to stop their chanting, and they were interviewed for a newspaper article.

"In all honesty, I wouldn't be doing this if it wasn't for AP," conceded Jill Smith, 17, after waving to more cars. "I think we know it probably won't do anything, but it's nice to see how many people feel the same way we do."

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23 comments:

  • 3GenNative posted at 2:52 pm on Wed, Dec 5, 2012.

    3GenNative Posts: 149

    Correct, Beck was on the City of Hayden Lake council at that time......But Government Way is not in the City of Hayden Lake!
    Government Way was a City of Hayden Project! Two Separate Cities!

     
  • IdaRINO posted at 2:15 pm on Wed, Dec 5, 2012.

    IdaRINO Posts: 1

    Way to go Hayden Lake! You have successfully re-reouted one of your busiest streets onto the streets of Hayden. That is great political manuevering. My kudos to the mayor, et al. I'm wondering why Hayden does not retaliate? Make Hillview, Dakota, Miles and Lacey all one way and route all that traffic onto Strahorn. Hayden tax dollars would be saved. It would be a "War on Transportation" and it would be fun to sit back and watch.

     
  • idaknow posted at 9:14 am on Wed, Dec 5, 2012.

    idaknow Posts: 1

    WhyNot- What has the Hayden Lake done to improve the Road. It is my pure speculation that if they were to do any improvements on the road it would have to be widened which is why is has remained untouched for so long. l

     
  • idaknow posted at 9:13 am on Wed, Dec 5, 2012.

    idaknow Posts: 1

    WhyNot- What has the Hayden Lake done to improve the Road. It is my pure speculation that if they were to do any improvements on the road it would have to be widened which is why is has remained untouched for so long. l

     
  • idaknow posted at 9:00 am on Wed, Dec 5, 2012.

    idaknow Posts: 1

    The "kiddies" didn't come up "Main Arterial". They probably did research and made a factual statement based upon such. It was the Idaho Department of Transportation. Just because there are houses on this street doesn't make it a neighborhood. Actual neighborhood roads like Hillview have suffered because of their neighboring city. The city of Hayden Lake acted selflessly in regards to their decision to make Strahorn a one-way. They diverted problems to other roads instead of fixing the problem. I have proposed making access to Hayden Lake limited only through Chalet Rd. from the south and Rimrock Rd from the north by dead ending streets and left and right turn only at others but the City of Hayden acts responsibly for all the citizens in our area and would not consider it.

     
  • NW-Rocks posted at 9:33 pm on Tue, Dec 4, 2012.

    NW-Rocks Posts: 1

    Remember that Beck was on they Hayden City Council when all that money was wasted on Government Way and we still have a 2 lane congested nightmare there, now with pretty center dividers. Of course he wants to keep Strahorn fouled up. He likes to move around and screw up roads in the interest of keeping areas "small" but has his hand out taking big developer money with his engineering firm. So go figure.

     
  • CHSdad posted at 5:47 pm on Tue, Dec 4, 2012.

    CHSdad Posts: 358

    Why not, what are you on? I never said I sped, I doubted those saying that speeding took place on that stretch of road. I pass through there at all times of day and my own experience is that that a typical speed is closer to 20 mph than 25, let alone anything quicker. The combination of pot holes, speed bumps and tree roots would surely get their revenge on anyone who tried anything faster. I then merely speculated as to why others might now speed through alternative routes.

    I agree that the trees are nicer than a screen. However, it is the trees that are destroying the road. My own feeling of being in the country does not start and end with that particular stretch of road. And whatever the speed of the traffic, this partial closure has had an adverse effect on other routes.

     
  • Why Not posted at 5:15 pm on Tue, Dec 4, 2012.

    Why Not Posts: 3719

    CHSdad - It means "the club" could be a better neighbor. They have a habit of thinking their poo-don't-stink.

    There is no reason to speed through a neighborhood - moron. If you are in such a rush, maybe you should try leaving earlier.

    You drive through, eh? I drive, run and walk my mutts and I can attest that there are significantly more people speeding than driving the speed limit. Maybe you can try taking a walk between 5A and 7A, or after 5P.

    The trees are a lot nicer than having a screen or wall parallel to the roadway. That's what will happen if the trees are removed to make way for a new roadway which would also be wider and require sidewalks. There is a lot more to a road upgrade than most people realize. The worst part is that it will wipe out more of the country feel we like here in Hayden.

     
  • APGOVSTUDENT posted at 3:52 pm on Tue, Dec 4, 2012.

    APGOVSTUDENT Posts: 2

    ^^ancientemplar: let me make clarify because I am sensing a bit of confusion on your behalf. While you seem to be under the impression that it was our government teacher's idea for us to stand on the corner of Strahorn and protest, I can assure you that he/she did nothing to encourage or approve of our expression of discontent. Your comment about including into the lesson plan a more constructive assignment that "will be useful to these students, beyond *their* days attending college" has been admired by our class because it shows true compassion for our future. Let me assure you, though, that you need not worry about the educational value of our government class, because we are learning a lot.

     
  • APGOVSTUDENT posted at 3:49 pm on Tue, Dec 4, 2012.

    APGOVSTUDENT Posts: 2

    ^ancientemplar: let me make clarify because I am sensing a bit of confusion on your behalf. While you seem to be under the impression that it was our government teacher's idea for us to stand on the corner of Strahorn and protest, I can assure you that he/she did nothing to encourage or approve of our expression of discontent. Your comment about including into the lesson plan a more constructive assignment that "will be useful to these students, beyond *their* days attending college" has been admired by our class because it shows true compassion for our future. Let me assure you, though, that you need not worry about the educational value of our government class, because we are learning a lot.

     
  • sorryimright posted at 3:14 pm on Tue, Dec 4, 2012.

    sorryimright Posts: 1

    "beyond *their* days"

    And I applaud these students for utilizing their freedom of speech. We need young Americans to voice their opinions. Also, I do believe that these students could choose to attend any government meeting to fulfill their government assignment, however they chose to put together a protest. I give kudos to this, as they decided to take action in their community rather than passively sit in a community meeting. Way to go!

     
  • CHSdad posted at 1:04 pm on Tue, Dec 4, 2012.

    CHSdad Posts: 358

    Why Not says "By improving access around its perimeter, the club would be more supportive and appreciated by the neighborhood". Sorry, but what on earth does that mean?

    I've traveled that stretch of road a few times daily for nearly 10 years and I've never seen speeding there. Let's face it, the road conditions don't allow anything in excess of 25, one way or two way. Changing it to one way does not improve the conditions, as the main cause of road degradation there is not the traffic, it is the tree roots. Making the road one way may have had the effect of increasing speeds on Hillview as people try to make up of lost time, but as they don't speed through the club, who cares!

    The trees are the problem, but the club want to keep them, so that's the end of it.

     
  • Why Not posted at 12:32 pm on Tue, Dec 4, 2012.

    Why Not Posts: 3719

    "The residents "by and large" support the one way. I am a resident and have yet to talk to anyone who supports it." -

    Interesting, well I am a resident and I support it and I know quite a few who also do. Bringing the roadway up to standard would be wasteful and da*n ugly for the whole neighborhood. By improving access around its perimeter, the club would be more supportive and appreciated by the neighborhood.

     
  • 3GenNative posted at 10:06 am on Tue, Dec 4, 2012.

    3GenNative Posts: 149

    Why would Hayden Lake take consultation from Hayden?

     
  • 3GenNative posted at 10:04 am on Tue, Dec 4, 2012.

    3GenNative Posts: 149

    Great understanding from a person against, then changed by knowledge and an open mind.

     
  • fromidaho posted at 9:04 am on Tue, Dec 4, 2012.

    fromidaho Posts: 12

    Great job kids!! Don’t let the condescending comments below deter you and your right to voice your opinions. Maybe the next step is to start a petition…

     
  • 986crazy posted at 8:43 am on Tue, Dec 4, 2012.

    986crazy Posts: 381

    " I wish I could shake the suspicion that this is mostly about country clubbers who want to cut down traffic around their houses, yet still have the taxpayers maintain the road." What else could it possibly be, really?

    This reminds me of the ludicrous passage of the NO PARKING area throughout Fort Grounds neighborhood next to NIC. These streets are maintained by the CITY not the HOMEOWNERS. It is absolutely ridiculous the way localities manipulate things for the benefit of the few wealthy citizens. Talk about an entitlement mentality! These rich folks sure have it.

     
  • ihateregistering posted at 7:38 am on Tue, Dec 4, 2012.

    ihateregistering Posts: 17

    Many of the trees mentioned that would have to be removed are in the public right of way and are a contributing factor to the roads deterioration. Get rid of them and their root systems.

    Mayor Beck was not Mayor at the time. A Mayor only votes in the event of a tie and there was no tie, therefore Mayor Morris did not vote on this issue. Mayor Beck, however, was a City Councilman at the time and did vote in favor of the road closure.

    The residents "by and large" support the one way. I am a resident and have yet to talk to anyone who supports it.

    How much did we just spend on a walking path that ends on a curve of Lakeview drive where it is needed the most? Oh, that would require the HLCC to move a few of the posts that hold the pseudo fence that is a cable.

    This is very much like the Hayden Lake Recreational Water and Sewer District's project. They went forward with the project then came to the residents with their hands out. They had a joke of a public meeting where the board sat stoic and said nothing while one of the attorney's was texting on her phone. These boards are getting really good at spending our tax dollars first then asking forgiveness later. Instead of us complaining on this site (which is rather therapeutic), we need to vote in a new council and sewer board who will put things to a vote and communicate with their residents.

     
  • ancientemplar posted at 7:30 am on Tue, Dec 4, 2012.

    ancientemplar Posts: 1108

    Surely the AP Government instructor could approve something more constructive and instructional that will be useful to these students, beyond they're days attending college, than standing on a street corner chanting. Amazing what they're teaching these impressionable minds.

     
  • Just_K posted at 6:46 am on Tue, Dec 4, 2012.

    Just_K Posts: 84

    I live on a street not far from Strahorn and am subject to the overflow of traffic traveling to northern points. My street has now become one of the new highways through the area and I understand why the residents and clubbers along Strahorn want their street restricted. Our quiet, previously seldom traveled road is now constantly bustling with overuse. The noise and danger from speeders is 24/7. The answer doesn't lie in road improvement or widening, it is people need to slow down and observe the traffic rules in residential areas. I witness speeders all of the time, of all ages, and wonder how they feel when someone is going 35-40 in their neighborhood of children walking to school, folks walking their dogs, or just out and about enjoying our beautiful scenery. The mentality seems to be "if no one catches me, it's ok". May all of you speeders insurance rates increase from speeding tickets to the point that you have no choice but to slow down! It might be the only thing that saves us :/

    As for Strahorn...I agree with the restriction. It's a narrow road in between an already developed golf course and what should be a quiet neighborhood. It's deteriorated and obviously would be very costly for a small town to have to replace. Conservation is the best thing to do until funds are available.

     
  • fromidaho posted at 6:11 am on Tue, Dec 4, 2012.

    fromidaho Posts: 12

    “Residents of Hayden Lake ‘by and large’ support the one-way street, Beck said.”

    Wrong. Here’s more data:
    1. There was never a vote
    2. The City of Hayden was not consulted and disagreed with the closing
    3. Tom Gorman – lives on Strahorn; is the city council’s transportation head; was the key to ‘bull dozing’ the issue thru the council.

    There should be a vote and let the people have a voice. Surely there can be a solution….

     
  • Why Not posted at 5:13 am on Tue, Dec 4, 2012.

    Why Not Posts: 3719

    Of course kiddies there are two sides to every story. Economics isn't the only reason for limiting access to Strahorn. Certainly you all realize a narrow deteriorating roadway is not a "main arterial" and the cost to upgrade involves much more than just cutting down a mile long swath of mature trees.

    The city tried in vain to get users to "slow down", first by installing speed humps, then allowing the golf course to plant the median at the course crossing, but alas up slope users continued to drive like Strahorn is Hwy 95. Your neighbors living on Miles are now dealing with a significant increase in traffic and people who believe the 25 MPH maximum speed limit does not apply to them. Tell you what, give me your address and I'll come and drive 50 MPH through your neighborhood every day.

    The bottom line, these roadways are neighborhoods folks, not main arterials as you kiddies profess. The fact is closing one lane of Strahorn has only moved the problem elsewhere. However, realizing Strahorn and the perimeter road around the golf course are least capable of managing the increasing up slope traffic and after being against the change, I now understand and support the City of Hayden Lake. Now if the county will kindly repair the Miles Ave camel trail and install speed humps, yeah right.

     
  • pubcrawler posted at 4:15 am on Tue, Dec 4, 2012.

    pubcrawler Posts: 78

    I bet that road closure costs local residents more than $100,000.00 per year adding a mile or more to each trip back up 4th. I wish I could shake the suspicion that this is mostly about country clubbers who want to cut down traffic around their houses, yet still have the taxpayers maintain the road.

     
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