Ironman Village goes up - Coeur d'Alene Press: Local News

Ironman Village goes up

Tents remain a constant as other aspects of annual race change

Print
Font Size:
Default font size
Larger font size

Posted: Thursday, June 20, 2013 12:00 am

COEUR d'ALENE - Some tweaks here and there, sure, but most things are holding steady.

Ironman Village is an example of the latter, and it went up Wednesday and will be open through the weekend beginning at 9 this morning.

Fifty-two vendors set up shop in City Park until Sunday, offering competitive or casual athletes a crack at top-of-the-line racing gear, not to mention something to eat, until 3 p.m. Monday.

But just south of the set up, at City Beach, is where the changes begin - at least on Sunday.

Gone this year is the mass swim start.

In its place is a new piloted swim start where athletes will filter into the water in self-seeded heats.

The reason for the change is safety.

"You decrease the anxiety level for the swimmers," said Michelle Haustein, Coeur d'Alene volunteer director for World Triathlon Corporation, on why the race changed its popular start. "It's going to spread us out in the water."

Spreading swimmers out in the water means keeping them from swimming on top of each other. The goal of the new method is to prevent football-like contact in the water, while making it easier for lifeguards to spot athletes who might be distressed. It has proven successful at other racing venues, such as Boulder, Colo.

Here's how the new wave will work:

Pros will go at 6 a.m.

Meanwhile, the rest of the athletes will seed themselves in groups according to how long they estimate they'll take to complete the 2.4-mile swim.

Signs marking 60 to 70 minutes, 80 minutes, 90 minutes and so on will be on the beach, and athletes will stand under which one fits their time. From 6:30 to 7 a.m., those heats will start to go in one heat at a time. Around 10 athletes at a time will walk through an arch and hit the water. Their chips will start counting time once they do.

So each athlete will be racing to his or her own clock. Knowing they can ease into the water around athletes of similar swimming ability eases some racers' minds.

"The huge thing is anxiety level. The issues we've had - swimmers are having a hard time breathing, they don't understand - it's all anxiety related," Haustein said. "You don't practice getting swam over, you don't practice getting hit in the face."

But that new wrinkle also changes another Ironman staple - the midnight finisher.

In years past, the whole race began at 7 a.m. and the course shut down at midnight. Crowds would always come out before 12 a.m. and cheer the last person to sneak across the Sherman Avenue finish line in less than 17 hours.

But because a good portion of the 3,000 participants will start before 7 a.m., it means they could finish shortly before midnight but still not qualify as an Ironman because the 17-hour rule still holds up.

Despite that, Race Director Mac Cavasar said they expect the same excitement around the midnight finish.

The only difference is that the crowd and athlete won't know the racer's final result until the next day if it comes down to a final-minute sprint.

A definite twist to how it went down before, but, just like in years past, participants have until the stroke of Monday morning to bustle to the finish line, where the crowd will be waiting.

"We're keeping the course open until midnight," Cavasar said.

Other than that, the 11th year of Ironman Coeur d'Alene appears to be following tradition. To match the 3,000 athletes, the event has 3,300 volunteers signed up to help. And the village? It's still packed with racing brand names like Sugoi and Shimano, not to mention food. Like Pilgrim's Market, which is selling green, vitamin-rich smoothies where the blender is operated by the power generated by, of all things, a bicycle.

Those who order, pedal, explained Sydney Williams, setting up the stand on Wednesday. One minute spinning the wheels gets you one large smoothie. That, and a few dollars.

"Because athletes and healthy food go together," she said.

The village is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., but closes Monday at 3 p.m.

COEUR d'ALENE -

The Ironman Foundation Community Fund will give $55,000 in grant funding to nonprofit groups in the Coeur d'Alene community as part of the 2013 Ironman Coeur d'Alene triathlon.

The donations will go to support to nonprofit needs and initiatives within the local community, and with this year's pledge, the foundation has given more than $570,000 since the race landed in the Lake City 11 years ago.

The Salvation Army Kroc Center and the city of Coeur d'Alene community fund will share $25,000 while the remaining $30,000 in grant donations will go to several nonprofit groups whose organizations have a volunteer component, the foundation announced this week.

More about

More about

More about

  • Discuss

Welcome to the discussion.

22 comments:

  • concernedcitizen posted at 6:41 pm on Mon, Jun 24, 2013.

    concernedcitizen Posts: 2530

    I believe $50,000 in actual pay out per year of OUR tax funds AS WELL AS police security, street dept., closures, street cleanup, honey buckets, etc.

    But remember, Ironman gives $55,000 to local charities. (which equates to $5,000 after the $50,000 of OUR money)

     
  • Jullee posted at 11:41 am on Mon, Jun 24, 2013.

    Jullee Posts: 540

    I guess my question earlier was too complicated.
    How much does it cost the city of CDA...AKA .. tax payers to fund this race ?

     
  • Eydie posted at 4:50 pm on Sat, Jun 22, 2013.

    Eydie Posts: 5

    There will always be folks with extreme ideas about the value of having an Ironman competition in CdA. It seems that there are many responses both for and against . . . but it also seems that just about everyone has the best interest of the athletes in mind. So, here is my comment. The officials claim to be creating a staggered start for the safety of the athletes. Given the recent deaths during IM swims, I would say that’s a valid concern. However, I don’t think they quite understand the physiology behind it. There is a phenomenon called Mammalian Diving reflex that has a drastic effect on swimmers, especially in cold water such as CdA Lake, even if they are not “holding their breath.” Sensory input to the Trigeminal nerve has an effect on the output of the Vagus nerve thus increasing peripheral vasoconstriction, reducing blood supply to peripheral areas (such as arms and legs for swimming, ergo cramping), increased mean arterial pressure, increasing blood pressure in general, decreasing oxygenation, causing a responsive increase in ventilation (the can’t breathe “panic attacks” that they see in the IM swim start), and possibly arrythmias. The only way to nullify this reflex is to gradually acclimate to the water . . . warm up!!!!! By not allowing the athletes to actually warm up, the officials are asking for trouble. Here’s my suggestion . . . go back to the mass start and allow athletes to warm up prior. If you need to limit the number of participants to make this safer, then it may mean a financial hit, but the athletes will be safer and happier.

     
  • concernedcitizen posted at 12:51 pm on Sat, Jun 22, 2013.

    concernedcitizen Posts: 2530

    I am sorry that you are unarmed. Well, good luck with the continued fleecing of the workers of this great nation for your profit.

    Good luck participants.

    :)

     
  • srfost posted at 7:35 am on Sat, Jun 22, 2013.

    srfost Posts: 42

    I have better things to do with my time than fight a battle of wits with an unarmed opponent.

     
  • yourneighbor posted at 7:28 am on Sat, Jun 22, 2013.

    yourneighbor Posts: 224

    To make that much money, and they still ask for volunteers? If you've been our and about you have to admit the traffic is pretty annoying.

     
  • concernedcitizen posted at 6:52 pm on Fri, Jun 21, 2013.

    concernedcitizen Posts: 2530

    So is srfost going to come back and refute the fact that is the good citizens of CdA that are the true philanthropists in the name of Ironman?

     
  • concernedcitizen posted at 3:39 pm on Thu, Jun 20, 2013.

    concernedcitizen Posts: 2530

    chilada01

    PLUS I believe the city of CdA gives Ironman $50,000 of taxpayers funds to be here so in all actuality the only give $5,000 in donations. Sounds like a sweet deal to me.

    ;)

     
  • my own opinion posted at 3:02 pm on Thu, Jun 20, 2013.

    my own opinion Posts: 397

    Hayden had a lot of cleaning to do the volunteers did the best but were not able to get it all so Hayden might have spent some money on clean up and potties, some potties stayed 2 weeks after the even pew! I am not sure if they were there not drained for the 2 weeks. Some neighborhoods only have one way out and were blocked. I hope since it is called Ironman CDA that it never takes advantage of the city's Of Hayden Lake/Hayden again.
    On a positive note good luck to all the fine athletes.

     
  • chilada01 posted at 2:01 pm on Thu, Jun 20, 2013.

    chilada01 Posts: 170


    Ironman Coeur d’Alene Fast Facts

    Total Participants: 2806 x $625.00 = $1,753,750 Wow that's a lot of money. Oh but wait they give 55,000 of that to charities.

     
  • CONFUSED posted at 12:26 pm on Thu, Jun 20, 2013.

    CONFUSED Posts: 67

    I could be wrong, but I dont think they do get reimbursed. That's why the City of PF, after a year or two, asked whomever is charged with finances at IM to be reimbursed and were told no so they decided to no longer allow it through the city. The leaders of PF decided it wasn't fair to have the citizens pick up the check.

     
  • Jullee posted at 11:16 am on Thu, Jun 20, 2013.

    Jullee Posts: 540

    Just curious, but what is the final cost to the city and tax payers with police / park repair /
    porta potties,emergency services/ clean up/ etc. ? Does Ironman pay for any of this ?

     
  • concernedcitizen posted at 10:53 am on Thu, Jun 20, 2013.

    concernedcitizen Posts: 2530

    srfrost

    You are correct. Volunteer, because NO ONE wants to pay anyone for anything unless they are connected to the in crowd in CdA.

     
  • LMYCDA posted at 10:35 am on Thu, Jun 20, 2013.

    LMYCDA Posts: 2068

    Can you provide me and anyone else interested the names each charity that has received funds from this event? Start from the first Ironman to present. Thank you.

     
  • LMYCDA posted at 10:33 am on Thu, Jun 20, 2013.

    LMYCDA Posts: 2068

    You mean like LCDC???

     
  • mister d posted at 8:25 am on Thu, Jun 20, 2013.

    mister d Posts: 1531

    I think this is a nice event for CDA. The people that come to the event, either as participants or supporters, seem to be respectful of our city and as mentioned they are not the types who hit the bars and get out of control. I would guess the promoters make enough money to be comfortable otherwise they probably would not continue with the effort. I am sure most volunteers know this and are fine with the idea, they volunteer for a completely different reason.

     
  • srfost posted at 7:29 am on Thu, Jun 20, 2013.

    srfost Posts: 42

    Well, first of all, the key word there concerned, is "volunteer". Last I checked, no one was being forced to spend a few hours of their day at the race. Second, I don't know if you're a business owner or not, but if you are, I'll bet you like to make a profit. But that's just a guess. If you're not a business owner, whoever you work for has to make a profit, or you're out of a job, don't you suppose? Sheesh, some people just aren't happy unless they're not happy! Like I Carry says, lighten up. There are a ton of other things that could be here that wouldn't be nearly as good for the community.

     
  • concernedcitizen posted at 7:11 am on Thu, Jun 20, 2013.

    concernedcitizen Posts: 2530

    srfrost

    This is STILL a "FOR PROFIT" event. Only a select few truly make anything off of it. It is the majority of the $30K per year that are asked AGAIN to volunteer and work for nothing yet pay the tab as well.

    Boasting about philanthropy does not pay locals a livable wage. It only makes one look arrogant.

     
  • I Carry posted at 7:01 am on Thu, Jun 20, 2013.

    I Carry Posts: 454

    voxpop, come on man! Lighten up already! The event IS a money raising event, it brings good clean honest people to our town, our town makes a few bucks, and we all get the chance to witness people trying to better themselves on a personal level. Would you (voxpop) be more inclined to host the skinheads, gangbangers, Taliban, zombies, or 1 per centers?
    Years ago, the hydro race attendants caused such a ruckus, the races were shut down. Voxpop, are you saying you welcome an event that attracts fights and hatred?
    Gee whizz folks, the ironman athlete and their support group probably won't be in front of you guys at the liquor store or the smoke shop. Voxpox, I'm certain you will find plenty of room on the Centennial Trail for you to do your 20K run come Sunday morning.
    ME THINKS ONE DOTH PROTEST TO MUCH
    about everything
    always
    peace out

     
  • srfost posted at 5:28 am on Thu, Jun 20, 2013.

    srfost Posts: 42

    It's easy to look up if you want to take the time; however, I guess it's just easier to stick to your misguided ignorance. These dollars donated come directly from race entry fees paid to WTC. But go ahead and keep on believing whatever it is you make up.

     
  • voxpop posted at 5:03 am on Thu, Jun 20, 2013.

    voxpop Posts: 738

    This is a community effort, NOT those who cruise the country making their millions off the backs of locals. I'd be happy to eat my words however when you find out just how much money THOSE people contribute to local charities. Or how much downtown business special interests put into the pot in their constant effort to enrich themselves off the backs of local taxpayers. When that slimmest of majorities in the city council stops marching to the drum of that priority I'll stop writing from my position of ignorance.

     
  • srfost posted at 1:57 am on Thu, Jun 20, 2013.

    srfost Posts: 42

    The Ironman Foundation Community Fund will give $55,000 in grant funding to nonprofit groups in the Coeur d'Alene community as part of the 2013 Ironman Coeur d'Alene triathlon.

    "The donations will go to support to nonprofit needs and initiatives within the local community, and with this year's pledge, the foundation has given more than $570,000 since the race landed in the Lake City 11 years ago.

    The Salvation Army Kroc Center and the city of Coeur d'Alene community fund will share $25,000 while the remaining $30,000 in grant donations will go to several nonprofit groups whose organizations have a volunteer component, the foundation announced this week."


    This is for you Voxpop, so you can quit writing from a position of ignorance.

     
default avatar
Welcome to the site! Login or Signup below.
|
Not you?||
Logout|My Dashboard

Stocks