Restoration work on Clark Fork delta set to begin

Print Article

A large restoration effort in the Clark Fork River delta is set to start this month and continue into March 2015.

The project is being coordinated by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game with input from local entities and individuals.

Work will begin in the Clark Fork drift yard this week. During construction, public access to the Clark Fork drift yard and boat launch will be closed.

Extensive bank erosion has occurred to islands and shorelines in the Clark Fork River delta, resulting in losses of soil and native riparian and wetland vegetation. Erosion has also impacted the quantity and quality of fish and wildlife habitat.

Much of the shoreline erosion in the Clark Fork delta is the result of wave action and water level fluctuations of Lake Pend Oreille.

The wave action is a result of the operation of the Albeni Falls Dam.

Additional habitat loss in the delta is attributed to the operation of the Cabinet Gorge Dam located upstream on the Clark Fork River.

The altered hydrology in the Clark Fork River and delta has resulted in changes in the wetland and aquatic vegetation cover.

The result is that many of the delta's wetland functions are severely impaired.

The restoration project is designed to protect areas vulnerable to erosion while improving and diversifying key riparian and wetland habitats; and, to restore natural ecological function in the delta.

The placement of large woody debris will add habitat complexity and promote the growth of diverse native riparian vegetation. Native species such as black cottonwood, dogwood and willow will benefit.

The project is scheduled to occur in stages to reduce impacts to fish and wildlife, as well as to reduce interruptions to public access.

Phase one, includes activities in the drift yard area and on two large island areas in the delta. The project will improve access to these areas from Idaho Highway 200. Roadways along the drift log yard will also be improved.

The second phase involves White Island and Derr Island.

The start date for the second phase of the project is yet to be determined, and is expected to occur within a few years.

A webpage has been created to provide ongoing information regarding the project. The website can be accessed at www.clarkforkdelta.org.

Individuals willing to provide volunteer assistance in the project are encouraged to sign up at the website.

Print Article

Read More Outdoors

Despite storms, Idaho winter is normal and emergency feeding is unneeded

February 14, 2019 at 5:00 am | Coeur d'Alene Press When big snow storms roll through Idaho, people often wonder how they will affect big game, and whether Idaho Fish and Game will start feeding deer, elk, pronghorn and other animals. The short answer...

Comments

Read More

RALPH BARTHOLDT: Hauling inestimable cargo in winter

February 14, 2019 at 5:00 am | Coeur d'Alene Press Cliff Mooney carried his knowledge of school buses and their ability to get-go through backcountry snow, quietly on his sleeve like a coffee stain. The former transportation supervisor for a small t...

Comments

Read More

Angliní with Anglen - February 1973

February 14, 2019 at 5:00 am | Coeur d'Alene Press Editorís note: For 27 years, beginning Feb. 8, 1973, Ralph Anglen of Bonners Ferry wrote an outdoor column for the local paper that was widely read and used as a source of fishing and hunting informa...

Comments

Read More

Elk hoof affliction found in Idaho

February 14, 2019 at 5:00 am | Coeur d'Alene Press A crippling disease causing abnormal hoof growth in elk, which became prevalent in western Washington about 10 years ago and later moved across Oregon, has found its way to Idaho. A hunter near Whit...

Comments

Read More

Contact Us

(208) 664-8176
215 N. Second St
Coeur d'Alene, Idaho 83814

©2019 The Coeur d'Alene Press Terms of Use Privacy Policy
X
X