New website highlights Clark Fork River Delta Restoration Project

Print Article

A multi-agency Clark Fork River Delta Restoration Project is underway, and a large construction effort has been ongoing through the winter months. A project website now provides an opportunity for the public to follow progress of the project.

The website is www.clarkforkdelta.org. The site features a new video that includes aerial footage of the work recently completed. Interviews with key project participants provide context and explain the goals of the partners in undertaking the project.

The project will protect, improve and restore key riparian and wetland habitats and their ecological function in the Clark Fork River delta.

Operations of the Albeni Falls Dam, Cabinet Gorge Dam and Noxon Rapids Dam have altered the hydrology of the Clark Fork River and Lake Pend Oreille. Wave action and fluctuating lake levels have resulted in extensive loss of soil and native riparian and wetland vegetation. Twelve to 15 acres of the delta's shorelines are lost each year from erosion. The quantity and quality of fish habitat and habitat complexity in the delta are also impacted by dam operations. The project is designed to mitigate these losses.

Areas vulnerable to erosion are being stabilized with rock structures. Riparian and wetland habitat is being improved and diversified behind the new bank protection.

New vegetation will soon be planted, and a weed management and monitoring effort will start in late April and continue throughout the summer. Conservation groups, school groups and individuals in the community are invited to participate. Volunteers can sign-up for scheduled activities on the project website.

The project is being conducted in phases over several years and involves about 1,200 acres. The Bonneville Power Administration and the Avista Corporation provided wildlife mitigation funding for the early phases of the project.

Phil Cooper is a wildlife conservation educator for the Idaho Department of Fish and Game in Coeur d'Alene.

Print Article

Read More Outdoors

Access bill shot down by southern Idaho lawmakers

March 21, 2019 at 5:00 am | Coeur d'Alene Press A lobbyist for one of Idahoís largest landowners pushed a bill through the Legislature last year that mandates a fine for trespassers and puts the onus of knowing private property boundaries on hunte...

Comments

Read More

Biologist busts some myths about wolves

March 21, 2019 at 5:00 am | Coeur d'Alene Press Wolves live in family groups. They donít think twice about traveling long distances. Theyíre territorial. They make a lot of noise. And some have no qualms about capturing and killing their foes. In...

Comments

Read More

RALPH BARTHOLDT: Throwing in the towel on winter with a good axe-tossing contest

March 21, 2019 at 5:00 am | Coeur d'Alene Press A hatchet works. Or an ax, but certainly not a splitting maul. And it isnít for the lack of trying. A splitting maul, when it turns in the air, is like an antique wagon wheel. Itís like those cu...

Comments

Read More

Angliní with Anglen ó March 1973

March 21, 2019 at 5:00 am | Coeur d'Alene Press Editorís note: For 27 years, beginning Feb. 8, 1973, Ralph Anglen of Bonners Ferry wrote an outdoor column for the local paper that was widely read and used as a source of fishing and hunting informa...

Comments

Read More

Contact Us

(208) 664-8176
215 N. Second St
Coeur d'Alene, Idaho 83814

©2019 The Coeur d'Alene Press Terms of Use Privacy Policy
X
X