Um, sir? Nobody asked you

Print Article

Pay your taxes, obey the law and youíre good to go.

Or stay.

But please, if youíre new to town, donít try to change anything but your socks.

A recent California transplant raised hackles aplenty last week when his opposition to a proposed development saw the light of print. Assuming the gentleman pays his taxes and otherwise commits no crimes, heís welcome to his opinion. If you ask folks who read his remarks and roared, though, the transplantís opinion would best be kept to himself.

Itís not a new issue. Weíre all blessed to live in a place where many others wish they could live. But few things incite internal riots more than Johnny-and-Joanie-Come-Latelies laying it on thick and heavy how they think the local script should be written.

This is not to suggest that Idaho natives should get two votes in every election, 20-year+ residents should get one, and newcomers should get a kick in the arse. But when it comes to weighing the merits of what residents want and donít want, better for the newbees to button up until theyíve lived here long enough to understand and appreciate why things are the way they are. Then, maybe then, someone will listen to their humble suggestions for support, opposition or change.

Hereís a little more free advice (and worth every penny.) No newcomer has the strength to slam the same door that let them in. If itís change you seek, you probably came to the wrong place. Too many times, people move and immediately set about trying to remake their new home into the place they just left. Trying to remake a new place into an old place that was so unsavory you had to leave just isnít very logical. Announcing it in a public forum will not make you many friends, either.

Our region is struggling with all sorts of growth issues, from increases in traffic and housing prices to shortages in the workforce because so many businesses are growing right along with the population. But these are the best kinds of problems to have.

Anybody been to Illinois recently? Taxes are through the roof, quite literally. Public entities struggle to pay their bills on time. Layoffs are the norm. The fiscally disastrous Land of Lincoln is in many ways the opposite of balanced-budget Idaho, which might explain why Illinoisí population is evaporating and Idahoís is booming.

North Idaho is far from perfect, but itís a damn sight better than many places. Pay your taxes, obey the law and respect the rights of others, and weíll get along just fine.

Print Article

Read More Editorial

Demonstrators miss mark by miles

September 18, 2019 at 5:00 am | Coeur d'Alene Press If only there were a vaccine to prevent gross misunderstandings. Protesters drawing attention to their frustrations in front of Kootenai Health last week exercised one of the precious rights every A...

Comments

Read More

How do you define happiness?

September 15, 2019 at 5:00 am | Coeur d'Alene Press As todayís news article on page A8 brightly reveals, youíre living in the sixth happiest state in the entire nation. Thatís the official opinion of a website called WalletHub.com, which put all sort...

Comments

Read More

Williams leaving wonít elevate Cardinal fortunes

September 13, 2019 at 5:00 am | Coeur d'Alene Press Note Sept. 27, 2019, on your calendars, North Idaho College sports fans. Somewhere down the line, look back on it and do some comparison work. On Sept. 27, Al Williams will formally retire as the s...

Comments

Read More

Never forget to pass along key lessons

September 11, 2019 at 5:00 am | Coeur d'Alene Press Where were you at 5:46 a.m. 18 years ago today? And at 6:03 a.m. that day, what, exactly, were you doing? Most of you reading this will be able to answer those questions without hesitation. At 5:46...

Comments

Read More

Contact Us

(208) 664-8176
215 N. Second St
Coeur d'Alene, Idaho 83814

©2019 The Coeur d'Alene Press Terms of Use Privacy Policy
X
X