ADVERTISING: Advertorial — DR. WENDY CUNNINGHAM: Ask Hayden Health

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Dear Dr. Wendy,

I have been on the Paleo diet for about six months now. I plan on indulging at Thanksgiving. How do I make sure I don’t derail all my progress and get back on track after the holiday?

Tom C.

Dear Tom,

You wouldn’t be the first person to fall off the healthy eating wagon on Thanksgiving! Don’t be too hard on yourself. One day of indulgence isn’t going to negate all your months of good choices. Here are some tips to get back on track:

Get moving. Exercising is a great way to get back on track. It helps control cravings, burns calories and helps to improve your mood and balance blood sugar. To burn all those extra carbs from Thanksgiving dinner, get your muscles moving and your heart rate up. It can be as simple as taking a brisk walk. And remember that even small activities add up, including taking stairs or cleaning the house.

Drink more water. Drinking water naturally curbs your appetite, making you less likely to overeat. Drinking more water also flushes out excess sodium to help you quickly de-bloat, and it gets your digestive system moving to relieve constipation. Your body fluids transport waste products in and out of your cells, while your kidneys and liver flush waste out of the body. This process can only work properly when you are well-hydrated, so aim for half your body weight in ounces in pure water.

Eat on a regular schedule. It may be tempting to try to make up for the extra calories by skipping meals the next day, but that is not a good idea. It is better to get back to your normal eating schedule. Skipping meals can make your cravings worse. Eating on a regular schedule can help regulate blood sugar and insulin levels, as well as hunger hormones. Focus on eating lean protein and lots of fresh vegetables while avoiding sugar. The protein and fiber in the vegetables help to slow digestion, which will help you feel full longer and keep your metabolism maximized.

**This Content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health providers with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.

• • •

Do you have a question to ask us? Please email them to Askcoach@haydenhealth.com.

Dr. Wendy Cunningham is a doctor of chiropractic, certified acupuncturist, and has her master’s degree in nutrition.

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