ADVERTISING: Advertorial — JONATHON M. SASSER: Metabolic syndrome

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Nearly every chronic or deadly disease can be tied in some way to metabolic dysregulation. For example, The Warburg Effect is the well-documented observation of increased glucose uptake in cancer cells. Although a ketogenic diet (also called “keto” — a diet low in carbohydrates) must be watched closely, a quick Google search of “ketogenic diet cancer therapy” reveals a barrage of literature demonstrating the increased efficacy of conventional cancer therapies when used alongside carbohydrate restricted diets like keto.

The metabolic syndrome diagnosis was created due to the observation that individuals with high blood pressure, high blood sugar, elevated triglyceride levels, excessive body fat deposited around the waist or abdomen and abnormal cholesterol levels, have a significantly increased risk of developing a heart attack, stroke or diabetes. These don’t just show up overnight. It takes years, if not decades, for them all to become full-blown metabolic syndrome.

The good news is that there is much that can be done to help the body, even after these conditions have appeared. Many patients fear that they will have to change everything about their lifestyle, avoid all the foods they love and eat a bunch of yucky vegetables. Are light exercise and vegetables really so repulsive that they aren’t worth the chance to feel better, live a more enjoyable life and make more memories with loved ones?

I do recommend exercise and vegetables (slathered in healthy fats), among other things. However, many of my patients are actually quite surprised by the attainability of my recommendations. Yes, exercise is an essential component to regulate many of the hormones and processes involved in your metabolism, but you don’t need to run marathons or become a triathlete to do it. I start by asking my patients to walk a few days a week, and we slowly add in some higher intensity movements. One of my favorites is called a tabata, and it only takes 4 minutes to get the job done!

Here’s a little secret — fats do not make us fat. In fact, they are ESSENTIAL to a plethora of our bodily processes, including the integrity and function of EVERY SINGLE CELL in our body. Our brain cells require fats to work properly and we require fats to create many of our hormones. Our body’s fat burning pathways are actually the most efficient energy production pathways. By reducing highly processed, refined carbohydrates in the diet and adding healthy fats, you will start to retrain these pathways in your body.

When patients begin care, we always start by putting together the puzzle of WHY their symptoms are occurring. In almost every case, we are focusing in some way on retraining their metabolic pathways, and the results are astounding. Blood sugars and blood pressures normalize, the weight starts to fall off, their lab values start to improve and best of all, they start feeling amazing. I even have patients who say they are starting to keep up with their kids and grandchildren!

Learn more by attending our upcoming health class, Metabolic Syndrome: Cardio, Weight, Diabetes, 7 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 6, at Vital Health in Coeur d’Alene. Fee: $10. RSVP: 208-765-1994 or register here: http://bit.ly/MetabolicClassNov2019.

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Jonathan M. Sasser holds a Master of Science degree in Oriental Medicine, is a Licensed Acupuncturist, and is board certified in Oriental Medicine by the NCCAOM. He has over 3,000 hours of training in acupuncture, classical Oriental Medicine, herbal medicine and nutrition. Additionally, Jon also holds a Bachelor’s degree in sports medicine. Jon is a “Health Detective.” He looks beyond your symptom picture and investigates WHY you are experiencing your symptoms in the first place. Jonathan is currently accepting new patients and offers natural health care services and whole food nutritional supplements at Vital Health in Coeur d’Alene. Visit our website at www.vitalhealthcda.com to learn more about Jonathan, view a list of upcoming health classes and read other informative articles. Jonathan can be reached at 208-765-1994 and would be happy to answer any questions regarding this topic.

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