ADVERTISING: Advertorial — JONATHAN M. SASSER: Acupuncture: Science-based medicine or Hokum?

Print Article

Think about this for a moment: does the placebo effect exist in animals? I知 inclined to think not. It is popular to write off the benefits of acupuncture as being a placebo effect, but if that is true then why is veterinary acupuncture used on a wide range of animals, from horses to cats, with extraordinary results? I admit, much of the world of acupuncture seems obscure to the untrained ear, and thus the ultimate question I usually get is, 電oes acupuncture work and how? The systems of acupuncture were created through rigorous observation of the body; I would venture to call it the original evidence-based medicine. Acupuncture is just a component of Chinese Medicine, a comprehensive medical system incorporating nutrition and herbal remedies among other adjuncts. Many of its observations, dating back several millennia, are being confirmed by modern biomedicine on a daily basis.

Unfortunately, I have nowhere near enough space to explain Chinese Medical terminology, so I will stick strictly to the physiological effects that have been observed during acupuncture. 鉄cience-based Mechanisms to Explain the Action of Acupuncture, an article in the Journal of the Association of Traditional Chinese Medicine, describes the cascade of events that happen locally around a needle, including increased blood flow, the release of growth factors and the activation of signaling pathways between cells and or nuclear binding proteins that promote the transcription of specific genes. 迭ewiring the Primary Somatosensory Cortex in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome with Acupuncture, an article in Brain, demonstrated the rewiring and over-sensitization that happens in the brain in response to chronic pain, and acupuncture痴 ability to help correct this rewiring. This is just scratching the surface; acupuncture has also been shown to stimulate the release of endorphins, positively affect gene expression, enhance immune system function and to reduce inflammation.

Further evidence of the efficacy of acupuncture and its adjunct modalities is seen in the adoption of several of those modalities by other medical professions. For example, many physical therapists are now using dry needling, which involves releasing trigger points in muscles, something acupuncturists have been doing for thousands of years but happens to have been independently discovered in the 1950s. Another great example is Graston Technique, which uses a special tool to rub across skin and the underlying tissues to break up adhered and tight bands of fascia and muscle. This is analogous to Gua Sha, another ancient technique in the repertoire of Chinese Medicine. Another, cupping, has seen significant exposure in recent Olympic Games through its widespread use among athletes, where it is used to stretch and break up adhered tissues, as well as improve circulation.

Acupuncture is just one of the tools I use to help restore my patients to health. I invest the time to understand the deeper causes of an individual痴 symptoms, and then we correct those issues with acupuncture, nutrition and lifestyle optimization.

Jonathan M. Sasser holds a Master of Science degree in Oriental Medicine, is a Licensed Acupuncturist and is board certified in Oriental Medicine by the NCCAOM. He has more than 3,000 hours of training in acupuncture, classical Oriental Medicine, herbal medicine and nutrition.

Additionally, Jon also holds a bachelor痴 degree in sports medicine. Jon is a 滴ealth Detective. He looks beyond your symptom picture and investigates WHY you are experiencing your symptoms in the first place. Jonathan is currently accepting new patients and offers natural health care services and whole food nutritional supplements at Vital Health in Coeur d但lene.

Visit our website at www.vitalhealthcda.com to learn more about Jonathan, view a list of upcoming health classes and read other informative articles. Jonathan can be reached at 208-765-1994 and would be happy to answer any questions regarding this topic.

Print Article

Read More Healthy Community

ADVERTISING: Advertorial HOLLY CARLING: The complex health picture

January 22, 2020 at 5:00 am | Coeur d'Alene Press With ever-increasing complexity in life, we learn to compartmentalize our life in an attempt to bring order to chaos. We have our spiritual life, family life, work life, social life, animal/pet life,...

Comments

Read More

ADVERTISING: Advertorial GEORGE BALLING: Wine on the road

January 22, 2020 at 5:00 am | Coeur d'Alene Press For the first time since we opened our shop, Mary and I were able to take off for a short vacation right after our busiest time of the year. We accomplished this feat by some good forward planning ba...

Comments

Read More

ADVERTISING: Advertorial ュ DR. WENDY CUNNINGHAM: Keeping positive in the winter months

January 22, 2020 at 5:00 am | Coeur d'Alene Press Do you like it when it is cold, grey, dark, rainy and snowy outside? Spending time at home with some movies, blankets and hot tea sounds like heaven to me, but for others, the 努inter blues can be h...

Comments

Read More

ADVERTISING: Advertorial DR. WAYNE M. FICHTER: What options do you have when back surgery fails?

January 22, 2020 at 5:00 am | Coeur d'Alene Press I read a very interesting study recently and learned something new. Ever hear of FBSS? No? Me neither. It stands for failed back surgery syndrome. According to a paper in the Journal of Pain Research...

Comments

Read More

Contact Us

(208) 664-8176
215 N. Second St
Coeur d'Alene, Idaho 83814

©2020 The Coeur d'Alene Press Terms of Use Privacy Policy
X
X