ADVERTISING — Advertorial: DR. WAYNE M. FICHTER: Can low-light laser therapy improve brain function?

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With depression and Alzheimer’s on the rise our brain health is understandably a top concern for most people these days. People are seeking every way possible to improve their brain and keep it healthy for life. Research has shown that there is a proven tool that you, and even your doctor, may not know about that is both affordable and easily available to improve your brain function. This valuable tool is called low-level laser therapy (LLLT).

The use of low level laser therapy has been around since the 1960s. LLLT has been used in the rehabilitation setting for years, but the therapeutic use of LLLT has broadened tremendously. It now includes a wide range of medical conditions such as stroke, myocardial infarction, some brain disorders and traumatic brain injuries. Research isn’t stopping there; it shows positive effects in treating other brain issues like depression, anxiety, autism, addiction, Parkinson’s and ALS.

LLLT has been cleared by the Food and Drug Administration and is found to be safe and effective without any harmful side effects. Low level laser’s don’t cut or burn human tissue like the high intensity lasers used in surgical procedures. LLLT promotes healing by encouraging cells to function optimally. Research has shown LLLT to be physically, cognitively and psychologically beneficial.

The most positive result that research has shown is the light from the LLLT devices causes a photochemical reaction within the mitochondria of the cells. The mitochondria’s job is to generate the majority of the energy in your cells. By stimulating the mitochondria, cells produce more energy to function properly and repair themselves. Mitochondria are vitally important for optimal brain health. Not only does LLLT therapy increase adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production, studies have shown that it increases oxygen levels in the brain, suppressing inflammation and increasing antioxidants, stem cells, and nerve growth factor, just to name a few.

Research has shown that LLLT could be a low-cost and effective treatment for depression and anxiety. While there’s limited research, a review of available research has found that nearly all studies to date investigating the effect of LLLT on mood disorders reported positive antidepressant responses. Studies have shown a decrease in oxygen levels in cerebral blood flow with people who suffer from depressive disorders. LLLT increases blood flow to the brain, which in return increases oxygen levels and reduces neuroinflammation. Research indicates a strong correlation between high concentrations of pro-inflammatory biomarkers in the nervous system and depression. Research shows a combination of the beneficial effects of LLLT on the brain help depression. Increased ATP production, increased oxygenation and blood flow, reduction of neuroinflammation may synergistically allow the brain to heal.

Research is showing that low level laser therapy has great potential for improving many brain conditions.

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Dr. Wayne M. Fichter Jr. is a chiropractor at Natural Spine Solutions. The business is located at 3913 Schreiber Way in Coeur d’Alene and the phone number is 208-966-4425.

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